coal


coal
   A lucky substance. It is regularly brought as one of the traditional gifts in *first footing on *New Year's Eve; some say this guarantees a warm hearth for the year, others that the main point is 'black for good luck' (cf. *black). In Herefordshire around 1900, 'a box of coal and a plate of salt should be the first things taken into an empty house, before moving any furniture in' (Leather, 1912: 86). There are references from the 1950s to the luck of carrying a lump of coal in one's pocket, and to making a wish when picking one up in the road and throwing it over one's shoulder (Opie and Tatem, 1989: 89); now that coal fires are so rare, these customs must have died out. See also *midsummer coal.

A Dictionary of English folklore. . 2014.

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  • Coal — Sedimentary Rock Anthracite coal Composition Primary carbon Secondary hydrogen, sulfur …   Wikipedia

  • Coal — (k[=o]l), n. [AS. col; akin to D. kool, OHG. chol, cholo, G. kohle, Icel. kol, pl., Sw. kol, Dan. kul; cf. Skr. jval to burn. Cf. {Kiln}, {Collier}.] 1. A thoroughly charred, and extinguished or still ignited, fragment from wood or other… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • coal — [ koul ] noun *** uncount a hard black substance that is dug from the ground and burned as fuel to provide heat: Put some more coal on the fire. coal dust a piece/lump of coal a. uncount used for talking about the industry of digging coal out of… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • coal — [kōl] n. [ME & OE col, charcoal, live coal, akin to Ger kohle, ON kol < IE base * g(e)u lo , live coal > Ir gual] 1. a kind of dark brown to black, combustible, sedimentary rock resulting from the partial decomposition of vegetable matter… …   English World dictionary

  • coal — W2S3 [kəul US koul] n [: Old English; Origin: col] 1.) [U] a hard black mineral which is dug out of the ground and burnt to produce heat ▪ Put some coal on the fire. ▪ the coal mining industry ▪ a lump of coal 2.) [C usually plural] a piece of… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • coal — O.E. col charcoal, live coal, from P.Gmc. *kula(n) (Cf. O.Fris. kole, M.Du. cole, Du. kool, O.H.G. chol, Ger. Kohle, O.N. kol), from PIE root *g(e)u lo live coal (Cf. Ir. gual coal ). Meaning mineral consisting of fo …   Etymology dictionary

  • Coal — Coal, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Coaled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Coaling}.] 1. To burn to charcoal; to char. [R.] [1913 Webster] Charcoal of roots, coaled into great pieces. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To mark or delineate with charcoal. Camden. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Coal — Coal, v. i. To take in coal; as, the steamer coaled at Southampton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • coal|er — «KOH luhr», noun. 1. a ship, freight car, or railroad, used for carrying or supplying coal. 2. a worker or merchant who supplies coal …   Useful english dictionary

  • coal|y — «KOH lee», adjective. 1. of or like coal. 2. containing coal …   Useful english dictionary

  • Coal — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Véase también: Carbón Es un fósil compuesto de combustibles y de otras substancias, por lo general se encuentran en ecosistemas pantanosos, donde los restos de las plantas son cubiertos por agua y lodo, y así, se… …   Wikipedia Español